Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation Keynotes for "Keeping It Wild"


Queen Quet “Keeping It Wild” in Lithonia, GA!!!

Join Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation and Founder of the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition as she provides a keynote address for “Keeping It Wild” in Lithonia, GA September 22, 2012.

Queen Quet, Chieftess and Head-of-State for the Gullah/Geechee Nation and Founder of the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition

Queen Quet is the founder of the advocacy organization for the continuation of Gullah/Geechee culture, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition. She worked with the U. S. Congress, the United States National Park Service, and other organizations for the passage of the “Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Act” which was signed into law by the President in 2006. She continues to work on protecting the environment and to insure that diverse groups of people engage in the outdoors and the policies governing them.

She was selected, elected, and installed by her people to be the first Queen Mother, “head pun de bodee,” and official spokesperson for the Gullah/Geechee Nation. As a result, she is respectfully referred to as “Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation and Head-of-State.”

Saturday, September 22, 2012

 2 – 3 pm Reception

3:30 – 4:30 pm Lecture

4:30 – 5 pm Book Signing

Lithonia Women’s Club, 2568 Wiggins St., Lithonia, GA 30058

Parking : Wiggins Street and in parking lot on Main Street

For more information contact Erica Weaver at 770-634-2849

To read and download the flyer, simply click on the link below:

http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1y65j/QueenQuetChieftessof/resources/index.htm

Queen Quet, Chieftess and Head-of-State for the Gullah/Geechee Nation and Founder of the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition.
Queen Quet is the founder of the advocacy organization for the continuation of Gullah/Geechee culture, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition. She worked with the U. S. Congress, the United States National Park Service, and other organizations for the passage of the “Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Act” which was signed into law by the President in 2006. She continues to work on protecting the environment and to insure that diverse groups of people engage in the outdoors and the policies governing them.
She was selected, elected, and installed by her people to be the first Queen Mother, “head pun de bodee,” and official spokesperson for the Gullah/Geechee Nation. As a result, she is respectfully referred to as “Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation and Head-of-State.”
For more information contact Erica Weaver at 770-634-2849
To read and download the flyer, simply click on the link below:
http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1y65j/QueenQuetChieftessof/resources/index.htm
www.gullahgeecheenation.com

Bird of the Month – September

Douglas “Birdman” Grey, Outdoor Afro Contributor

If you haven’t noticed…birds tend to fascinate me. This month’s feathered friend is like no other. It must be the engineering side of me that marvels at the feats of this month’s tiny avian creation.
We in the engineering world often use the term “operational parameters” when describing a machine or system’s capabilities. It is the operational parameters of this month’s bird, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, which fascinate and marvel me. Here are just a few of these interesting parameters to which I refer:

  • They’re able to fly forwards, backwards, sideways, up, down, and stop and hover in one spot (and for short distances they can even fly upside-down).
  • They can fly up to 60 miles per hour.
  • They can flap their wings 60-80 times per second in normal flight…but can beat them 200 times per second during courtship dives.
  • At rest, their heart beats around 250 times per minute, but during flight their heart beats about 1300 times per minute.
  • They migrate for thousands of miles…but the most fascinating thing about their migration is that many make a huge jump across the Gulf of Mexico. A trip of about 500-600 miles, which they are able to do non-stop. (All from a bird that weighs only 0.1 ounce.)
  • They almost consume their entire weight in nectar, sap, sugar water, and insects every day. When in its active state, a hummingbird will starve to death if it doesn’t eat every few hours.
  • Hummingbirds are not only the world’s smallest bird, but the smallest known animal with a backbone.
  • Hummingbird eggs are so small, that a penny could cover 3 of them completely.
  • Hummingbirds can see and hear better than we humans, but they cannot smell.
  • Hummingbirds only live here in the Western Hemisphere. (About 340 different species)

OK…I’ll stop…I could easily continue, but you get the point. Hummingbirds are “very” interesting indeed.
One of my most memorable bird watching sights this year involved a Ruby-throated Hummingbird. While out birding one day, I had the opportunity to observe a “hummer” delicately and precisely dine on insects that it would pluck out of a spider’s nest. What would seem to be an almost impossible task by any other creature, this hummingbird conquered without any difficulty whatsoever. When the builder of the web came out in protest, it was quickly plucked out just as easily as the trapped insects. Watching this bird eat these insects and spider made me realize that these birds eat a lot more protein than I had previously thought; something I was able to research and verify.
Not only am I impressed with the hummingbird because of its abilities, but in my opinion, hummingbirds are some of the world’s most beautiful birds. I’m sure the Spaniards who first laid eyes on them thought so too…because when these early explorers saw them for the first time they called them “Joyas Voladoras” or “Flying Jewels”. A very fitting name indeed!
If you get the chance, check out the making of a wonderful film on hummingbirds.
If you have time to watch the entire PBS nature video “Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air” check it out!

Lynne Arrowsmith

Douglas “Birdman” Gray has been birding almost all of his life. He grew up on a family farm near Clarksville, Tennessee, where they grew crops ranging from apricots to wheat, and most things in between. They also raised chickens, guineas, pigs, horses, and a cow named…….Apples. Doug’s grandfather identified the birds they would see daily on the farm.

Doug now resides in Indianapolis and works in Parenteral Engineering with Eli Lilly and Company. Most of his current birding takes place in Indiana, with a concentration on Central Indiana, where he leads bird walks for “Backyard Birds”. Doug can be reached at 317-255-7333.

A Day of Service: Celebrating the Legacy of Dr. King

Rubén and a watershed model

Like many others around the country, this year I spent the Martin Luther King Day Holiday in service of my local community. I chose to do restoration at the aptly named Martin Luther King shoreline in Oakland, California. The area is located just a stones throw away from a congested freeway and sports complex, and is a gorgeous natural environment teeming with local birds and other wildlife that connects to the beautiful San Francisco Bay.

Sunset at the MLK Shoreline Courtesy of the EBRP District     (a sunnier day than today)

In spite of the heavy rain, scores of people from nearly every walk of life and representing many organizations came out to put native plants in the ground, and do the meticulous clean-up of debris that washes in from the surrounding community’s streams and gutters.
Rubén, my co-worker at Golden Gate Audubon was on hand with a watershed model city and demonstrated to participants just how humans have an important impact on wild spaces — for better or worse. The East Bay Regional Parks, who were also key coordinators for the event, educated the public about  how birds ingest plastic and other trash that remains trapped in their digestive system.
My kids and I walked along the shore and together we filled up a bag of all kinds of debris. A bottle cap here, pieces of styrofoam there; altogether a menace to this local environment. As we cleaned up, my 6 and 8 year old expressed their frustration, “why would people do this?” I answered, “I don’t know,” but inside felt grateful that even at their young age, they understood how people can make a difference in their local environment and were able to see first hand the consequences of indifference. I think Dr. King would be proud.
Did you choose to serve today? If so, what did you do?